9-1-1 Call Information

Tips for Reporting Fire Emergencies:
If you think something is on fire, fire alarm is going off or hazardous material is leaking, call 9-1-1 immediately!
  • Stay on the Line, Do Not Hang Up!
  • Remain Calm and Speak Clearly.
  • Keep your answers short and to the point.
  • Provide the 9-1-1 Call-taker with the following information:
  • The location of the emergency (Street Number, Street Name and City/Town). Any additional information that will assist emergency responders in locating the emergency.
  • Apartment, Suite or Unit Number.
  • Landmarks: Business Name, Mile Markers or Nearest Intersecting Streets.
  • Your name and the telephone number you are calling from.
  • What is the nature of the Fire Emergency?

The 9-1-1 Call-taker is required to ask you questions about the fire emergency. Answer all questions asked by the 9-1-1 Call-taker.

  • Answering these questions will not delay a response, but will make sure all appropriate agencies are notified.
  • Some fire emergencies may also require Police and/or Ambulance to be notified.
  • Answering these questions will help them respond to the call and provide appropriate fire protection.
  • Answering these questions will assist the 9-1-1 Call-taker in determining if Pre-Arrival Instruction are needed.
  • Pre-Arrival Instructions are steps that you can perform prior to the arrival of the Fire Department. The 9-1-1 Call-taker is specially trained in providing these instructions to you.
  • These instructions may help you save someone's life!

Here are a few of the questions the 9-1-1 Call-taker will ask for these fire emergencies: 

Structure Fires (Home or Office)  
If a building has caught fire, have everyone evacuate the building and call 9-1-1 from a cellular, cordless or neighbor's telephone.
  • Where in the building is the fire located.
  • What is burning?
  • What color the flames and smoke are?
  • Is anyone is injured and what type of injuries?
  • If you know how the fire started or if there is anything unusual about the fire tell the 9-1-1 Call-taker.
  • If there are any vehicles or other buildings involved or threatened by the fire, tell the 9-1-1 Call-taker.
  • Answer all other questions ask by the 9-1-1 Call-taker.

Carbon Monoxide Alarms

  • If anyone is feeling sick, have everyone evacuate the building and call 9-1-1 from a cellular, cordless or neighbor's telephone.
  • Is anyone feeling sick? Symptoms are: Headaches, Dizziness, Nausea, Confusion, Sleepiness, Irritability or drunken behavior.
  • How long has the detector has been going off?
  • Do you smell any odors in the residence?
  • How long has the detector been sounding?
  • Answer all other questions ask by the 9-1-1 Call-taker.

Hazardous Materials Incidents

  • Have everyone evacuate the area and affected building, then call 9-1-1 from a cellular, cordless or neighbor's telephone.
  • If you know what the spill or leak is tell the 9-1-1 Call-taker.
  • Is the material a Solid, Liquid, or Gas?
  • Is anyone is injured or contaminated?
  • Is anyone trapped anywhere near the spill or leak? Do not try to rescue the trapped person.
  • If you can see any placards where the spill or leak is coming from.
  • If there is anything on fire and what is on fire?
  • What is the color of smoke and fire.
  • Do you smell any odors?
  • Answer all other questions ask by the 9-1-1 Call-taker.

If you have additional questions or would like more information about fire emergencies, please feel free to contact the Shelburne Communications Center at (802) 985-8051 or your local Fire Department.

 
What You Need to Know When Making a Cellular 9-1-1 Call:
Cellular telephones differ from traditional home or business telephone services in a number of ways. By educating yourself with the information provided, you will know when to call 9-1-1 and what to expect.

Can I dial 9-1-1 from my cellular telephone? 
YES - The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) issued rules requiring cellular providers to provide access to 9-1-1, regardless of whether the call subscribes to the cellular provider's service or not. This is known as Basic 9-1-1 service. 

Will the 9-1-1 Call-taker know where I am? 
Cellular telephones do not provide the same type of information to the 9-1-1 Call-taker that a traditional telephone services. Depending on the technology and the type of cellular telephone being used, the 9-1-1 Call-taker may only know one of the following:
1. Location of the cellular site that received your call and your telephone number. This is known as a Phase 1 call. A Phase 1 call only provides the 9-1-1 Call-taker with the cellular site and the general coverage area of the site. You should be located somewhere within this coverage area, which could cover multiple towns.
2. The approximate latitude and longitude of your cellular telephone. This is known as a Phase 2 call. Phase 2 calls still have limitations base on the technology used by your cellular provider, which can affect the accuracy.
This is why you must be prepared to give the 9-1-1 Call-taker your location. 

Tips for Making a Cellular 9-1-1 Call:
When making a cellular 9-1-1 call, the Call-taker may not automatically know your location. You should be prepared to provide the following information. 
  
  • If the emergency is at a residence or business please provide
  •    Street Number, Street Name and City/Town 
  •   If the emergency is on a highway please provide
  •    Street/Highway Name and direction of travel (North, South, East or Westbound) 
  •   Nearest intersecting Street Name 
  •   Mile Marker, Exit Number or Landmarks 
  •   The telephone number you are calling from
  •    What is the nature of the Emergency
  •    Your name

Answer all other questions ask by the 9-1-1 Call-taker. The 9-1-1 Call-taker is required to ask these questions. The information you provide will assist the 9-1-1 Call-taker in determining the appropriate emergency service providers to send. 

Unused Celular Telephones are Not Toys: 
We have dealt with multiple children that were given unused cellular telephones as toys. In one case, we received more than 60 calls from the same child. This incident took approximately 2 hours and required the Police Officer to check multiple locations before the child was located. Amazingly, in all these cases the parents recharged the telephone for the children. These telephones are still able to call 9-1-1. Please do not give an operational cellular telephone to your children as a toys.